So I'll admit it: I've always kind of had a design crush on the Guardian's website, and I may or may not have tried to emulate it in various other news websites I've developed. What I love most about the Guardian's design is simply its proprietary typeface. That slightly "Georgia" looking serif with the curbed nodules and cut-off "G's" instantly alerts the user that they're interacting with the Guardian brand. Another strong aspect of the site is that it succeeds where  many legacy news organizations fail in that it successfully and cleanly integrates an array of different content, from videos, to mugshots for columnists, to vertical celebrity shoots and to landscape scenes of world political affairs and crises. Though it may seem obvious, the coordianted color schemes on the site allow the user to receive visual cues about which section she's reading or encountering. Color is perhaps the Guardian's strongest visual element.

What also makes the Guardian site in my view the almost perfect model for for-profit news sites is its interactivity. Designers don't have to worry about whether the body text of the articles will make the page look visually too distracting, as users can simply hover over a picture to read the excerpt. It also likely increases audience engagement, asssuming that people click or hover on stories who may not have otherwise.

I could go on and on for days about what a groundbreaking model the Guardian's website is––like how its use of white space around the header gives users a sense of minimalism, or the way in which the site displays its ads. But I won't. All I'll say is that it's so user-friendly that it's hopped over the pond to circulate in America.